What happens to the windows after they’re replaced?

As I was at an install one day getting some video footage I walked by these old windows. They’re actually original to the home which was built in 1904. I had the question of, “What happens to the old windows that are replaced?” as I’m sure most of you wonder as well.

First off, it’s pretty impressive that these windows are 115 years old and still look this good, they’re called true divided lite windows. This means it contains six separate panes of glass. If a wood window was built before 1960 it’s promising to say they typically stay in decent condition.

So what does EHI do with them??

The first things that are done with metal or vinyl windows are we discard the glass and recycle the rest. EHI throws a big Christmas party each year where bonuses are given out. From the money that is made from recycling, this goes to the bonuses for everyone.

Wood windows are a little different for us… There’s a man in Goodlettsville, TN who builds greenhouses and several of the old wood windows are donated to him. I mean just take a look at this! It’s pretty cool and innovative. Have you gotten creative with your old windows or know someone that has? If so, drop a pic in the Facebook comments and the picture chosen by EHI will get a $25 gift card to Scouts Pub!

Making your Historic Windows Efficient While Keeping their Charm

Should you replace your historic windows with new energy efficient windows to save energy? Or should you keep the charm and not save as much energy?

This will depend on if you’re a preservationist or an environmentalist. There is a way to be both in this difficult decision. You can keep the uniqueness of the window while still improving the efficiency of them.

According to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, old windows typically last longer and have thicker glass, compared to today’s windows. Plus, if you update your historic windows, you’re not using any new resources (conserving), and you’re also preserving at the same time.

Historic windows generally have a uniqueness to them that new windows just don’t have. You won’t find an intricate stained-glass window in a newly built home. It’s inevitable not ever to have any issues with your windows, especially if they’re old.

If you start to experience problems with your historic windows such as leaking you might want to consider replacing the existing sash, frame, and glass. If you’re experiencing a draft or wishing to insulate your window better, there are ways to draft proof and insult with appropriate caulking and weather-stripping materials.

Wanting to reduce the energy bill on your historic windows? By adding storm windows indoor or outdoor and also adding heavy drapes can help with this. Adding extra locks to window sashes will tighten the window’s seal which will help prevent air inflow and outflow.

Still not sure if your historic windows are worth saving? Contact EHI, and we can answer any questions on whether you should replace or save your windows!